Conference Venue

Nizhny Novgorod is an important economic, transportation, scientific, educational and cultural center in Russia and the vast Volga-Vyatka economic region, and is the main center of river tourism in Russia. In the historic part of the city there is a large number of universities, theaters, museums and churches. Nizhny Novgorod is located about 400 km (250 mi) east of Moscow, where the Oka River empties into the Volga.

Nizhny Novgorod (Gorky in 1932-1990) was founded in 1221 by the Prince Yury (George) Vsevolodovich - grandson of the founder of Moscow, Prince Yuri Dolgoruky and great-grandson of Kiev Prince Vladimir Monomakh. Nizhny Novgorod is an ancient city in Central Russia with a rich history. Here, the stone Kremlin, built in the early 16th century, as well as many churches and temples, have been preserved in good condition.

The most famous people born in Nizhny Novgorod are Ivan Kulibin, the famous mechanic-inventor, Koz’ma Minin who made up the military glory of Russia, mathematician Nikolay Lobachevsky, writer Maxim Gorky, actors Igor Ilyinsky and Evgeny Evstigneev and so on.

Nizhny Novgorod holds 8 universities, 3 smaller schools of higher education, a conservatory and more than 5 institutes. It is home to 5 research institutes of Russian Academy of Sciences.

The city is also known for its beautiful views of the confluence of the two great Russian rivers Oka and Volga and for the forests at the left bank of Volga River, opening from the embankments located on the high right banks of the Oka and Volga.

Nizhny Novgorod can be easily reached by many direct daily flights from Moscow, St.Petersburg and many other cities in Russia and abroad. It can also be reached by fast express train from Moscow.

The scientific sessions will take place in Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry of RAS and in State University of Nizhny Novgorod.

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